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Hiring your first employee is a huge step for any startup. It shows that you’re willing to take on more risk in order to make your idea a reality. It also shows that your business is beginning to grow. But hiring that first employee can be a difficult process. You need to find someone that understands what they’re getting themselves into, that is passionate about your company’s mission, and is willing to put in the work to achieve the company’s goals. So how do you do that? Here are a few tips to help you along the way.

Hire As Soon As You Can

Even if it’s a bit tight, hire someone as soon as possible. Having someone on board will allow you to focus on the things that are most important to you, and they’ll give you the necessary boost of creativity and brainpower to get the job done.

Many founders are reluctant to hire even when they know that they’re overworked. This can lead to them kicking themselves after realizing that they’re not getting enough done.

Don’t Just Look At Track Record

One of the most important traits of a skilled hiring manager is his or her ability to see potential. This includes looking for someone with a passion for missions and causes that are similar to yours, and someone who has the necessary skills to excel at what they’re doing.

One of the most important factors that a hiring manager should consider is finding someone who is passionate about their passions and skills. Even if a person has not yet found a way to fully unleash themselves, if their position can help them do so, they’ll most likely see results. It shouldn’t always be about the person you’re hiring’s track record.

Make Them Part Of The Team, Not Just An Employee

When hiring your first employee, you have a major choice to think about. You can either consider them an employee, who will be expected to perform certain tasks or a member of the team that has dedicated their time to making the company’s vision a reality. While yes, they’re ultimately an employee of the company, it’s better to look at them as someone who is passionate about helping the company meet their goals as opposed to another body who comes into the office, gets their job done, and goes home. They should be a part of major business decisions, and they should be treated as an equal, not an underling.